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'hyarme'ndakil'
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  • Updated 21 March 2018
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Hyarmendacil I

The conqueror of the Harad

Kings of Gondor

A man originally named Ciryaher, the heir to Gondor's throne who saw his father Ciryandil slain at the hands of the Men of Harad. To avenge his father's death, the new King took a great army and conquered the southern lands of the Harad, ruling thereafter under the name Hyarmendacil, 'South-victor'. He ruled in Gondor for no less than for one hundred and thirty-four years, and was succeeded by his son Atanatar.


Notes

1

The date of Hyarmendacil's birth appears only in The History of Middle-earth volume 12, The Peoples of Middle-earth. It cannot therefore be considered completely reliable.

2

Osgiliath had originally been the sole capital of the South-kingdom, but Hyarmendacil's forerunner Ostoher had rebuilt the city of Minas Anor and taken to using it as his royal seat during the summer. This tradition was still in force during Hyarmendacil's time, and would continue to survive for several centuries afterward.

3

In III 1050 King Ciryaher (as he was then known) led a force of Gondorians southwards to break the Siege of Umbar and bring the Haradrim under his power. At this time he changed his name to Hyarmendacil, 'South-victor', to commemorate his great victory over his southern enemies. In doing so he followed a pattern established by his ancestor Tarostar, who defeated invading Easterlings and took the name Rómendacil, 'East-victor'. This same convention would recur in the future, with a second Rómendacil and a second Hyarmendacil taking those names in the centuries to come, as Gondor won further victories over its enemies to the East and South.

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About this entry:

  • Updated 21 March 2018
  • This entry is complete

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